Should I try and find another 2 1/4 petrol or try a 200 tdi conversion?

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mcmoonter

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  • Posts: 7
  • Name: Peter McLaren
I recently bought a petrol series 3 109 as a project. It had good and bad points. A new chassis, reconditioned bulkhead, genuine new boxed panels to make up the rear tub, and what was described as an MOD reconditioned engine with under 5000 miles. It was a 24V FFR truck cab

I failed to check the engine when I bought it. The seller stated that it ran well when parked up some 18 years before hand. I had little need to doubt him when I collected it.

When I got home, I found it had seized. I poured diesel and ATF through the spark plugs hoping it would free up.

Today I took the head off to find number two cylinder was really cruddy. The valves still moved in the guides, but the valves looked rusty. The corrosion at the top of the bore was a bigger concern. Using a drill mounted wire brush, it has gouged out a large chunk of the top of the bore into what must be really close to the water jacket. With the head off, it still proved impossible to turn from the crank pulley nut.

I doubt if Iíll get any goodwill from the seller by way of compensation, heís got my cash.

So, Iím at a crossroads. Series petrol engines used to be easily found and not much cost. So that would have been my preferred route. With the changes in petrol, itís set me to thinking, would I be better off thing to find and fit a 200tdi. I have a lead on an engine, and am wondering how difficult the conversion is. Iím mindful always of costs. What would be your chosen route given my circumstances?
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Thanks in advance, Peter

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chrislightweight

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  • Posts: 100
Depending on what your using it for I'd stuck with a 2 1/4 petrol

Unless you have the whole car to get all the small bits you need a tdi conversion is neither quick or cheap

2 1/4 petrol engines can still be had and your engine will have some value

Also I'd keep it original too ,plenty tdi engined series out there now 

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mcmoonter

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  • Posts: 7
  • Name: Peter McLaren
Thatís sound advice, the simplicity of the 2 1/4 is what appealed. Iíve been down the conversion tunnel before and  the costs mount up too quickly. Iíd like to try and keep it as original as possible

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Alan Mc

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I used to run a 2 1/4 petrol  and was good.  My subsequent motor however had a 2.5 petrol, which doesnít sound like much of a step up, but an improvement. 

Iíd go 2.5 petrol as 1st choice, 2 1/4 second. 

Alan.

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chrislightweight

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  • Posts: 100
If you can get a 2.5 petrol that would be great ,you could use the existing wiring and I assume the rad too

So it would be easy to swap back to 2 1/4 at a later date

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mcmoonter

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  • Posts: 7
  • Name: Peter McLaren
Thanks for all the advice so far.

I popped down to the machine shop this morning with some photos of the corrosion damage to number two cylinder. The guys were very helpful. They said they could put a sleeve on the cylinder with an overhanging lip which would save the portion where the gasket would seal at the top of the cylinder on the deck. Cost wasnít staggering, around £200.

I agreed to strip the block down, knock out the pistons and take it down for a first hand assessment. They thought the pistons may be ok and that a new set of rings and bearing shells might save the day. Iím keeping my fingers crossed.

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chrislightweight

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A guy has just listed parts from a pair of series he stripped in the for sale section

Might be worth a ask

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rangerovering

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Is it a 5 bearing engine? I'm no expert but if you can get pistons the machine shop could bore out for 2.5 litres and you use the bigger pistons?

Steve




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mcmoonter

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  • Posts: 7
  • Name: Peter McLaren
Iíve bitten the bullet, and gone for a rebuild of my existing engine. I took the block to the machine shop this morning, they will sleeve the bad cylinder, and will rebore them all together. The cost of parts and labour will be about £600. The crank and big ends were still standard, so new shells. New valves, timing gears and chain, new oil pump and all should be hunky dory again. I think itís a sound investment over an unknown replacement engine as well as the peace of mind knowing itís as good as it can be.

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MattR

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  • Posts: 5
  • Name: Matt Roche
Which machine shop did you use? Are they a Land Rover specialist or are all machine shops equal?

Thanks.